August 2018 was 5th hottest August on record for the globe

August 2018

The average global temperature in August was 1.33 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 60.1 degrees. This was the fifth highest global temperature for August in the 139-year record (1880–2018). Last month was also the 42nd consecutive August and the 404th consecutive month with temperatures above average.

The year to date I January through August

The year-to-date average global temperature was 1.37 degrees F above average of 57.3 degrees. This is the fourth highest on record for the January through August (YTD) period, but 0.47 of a degree lower than the record high set in 2016 for the same period.

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Source: Environmental News Network

Atmospheric carbon dioxide soars past crucial milestone

Earth has passed an “unfortunate milestone,” read an email alert sent out last Saturday evening Australia time. “During the last 4 days, the CO2 [carbon dioxide] levels at Cape Grim have risen above 400 parts per million (ppm),” Paul Krummel, an atmospheric scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Organisation (CSIRO) wrote to scientists.

Although the measurement was expected, it is a clear warning that the level of atmospheric CO2 is entering dangerous territory, up from 280 ppm at the start of the industrial age around the year 1800. Scientists figure that the accumulation of greenhouse gases has pushed global temperatures up nearly 1.5°C since 1850. They estimate that 2°C of warming will occur at 450 ppm. Under the Paris agreement, reached at last December’s climate conference, 195 nations pledged to avoid dangerous climate change by limiting global warming to below 2°C above preindustrial levels.

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Source: Science

Global warming: High carbon in air affects crop nutrient quality

Yet another study warns that global warming could affect the quality of crops by inhibiting nutrient absorption.

Done on wheat and rice, the study by researchers at the University of Gothenburg saw that rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere affect absorption of nitrogen by plants, which is a vital nutrient for most crops.

The low concentration of nitrogen in tissues was seen regardless of plant growth.

The study examined various types of ecosystems, including crops, grasslands and forests, and involved large-scale field experiments conducted in eight countries on four continents.

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Source: International Business Times UK